domingo, 20 de septiembre de 2015

Have or has?

We use have in the simple present tense when talking about a plural subject or the personal pronouns I, you, we and they.

We use has in the simple present tense when talking about a singular subject, including the personal pronouns he, she and it.

Have with Plural Subjects:

Laura and Steve have a baby.
John and I have an old computer.
Kate and Sara have dinner at seven.  

Have with Personal Pronouns:

I have a new cellphone.
You have a brother.
We have a great idea.

Has with Singular Subjects:

Rose has two sisters.
Ryan has a new friend.  
                                                                                    
Has with Personal Pronouns:

She has a pet cat.
It has a great smell sense.

In negative sentences we use the auxiliary verb don’t or doesn’t, so we don’t write has, no matter if the subject is singular or plural.

Ryan doesn’t have any brother.
They don’t have money to buy a new house.

In questions we use the auxiliary verb do or don’t, so we don’t write has, no matter if the subject is singular or plural.

Does Anna have a new car?
Do you have a pet?

Translate